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Bishop Cipollini prays with the faithful during a 'missionary pastoral visit' to São Caetano do Sul, in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, in September 2016. Photo courtesy: Diocese of Santo André
FaithDispatches
Filipe Domingues
“It is clericalism that prevents the church today from being missionary,” Bishop Cipollini said. “I have great hope that the synod on synodality can make clericalism collapse—perhaps not entirely, but at least in its major strongholds.”
A baby is baptized in this 2007 file photo. Father Andres Arango, pastor of St. Gregory Parish in Phoenix, submitted his resignation letter to Phoenix Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted Feb. 1, 2022, for performing invalid baptisms throughout his ministry by regularly using an incorrect formula. (CNS photo/Lisa Schulte, Catholic Voice)
FaithDispatches
Eduardo Campos Lima
Members of one of his former communities said they doubt that he used incorrect formulas for sacraments while he worked there, and many of them recall him fondly as one of the most important priests in their lives.
Father Lancellotti distributes food to homeless people in front of São Paulo’s metropolitan cathedral. Photo: Luciney Martins.
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Eduardo Campos Lima
The Rev. Júlio Lancellotti is São Paulo’s designated vicar for street people. He has been posting images of spikes and other elements of hostile architecture gathered from cell phone photos or video from all over Brazil.
In a still taken from “Unguarded” (© Camino NYC Productions), courtesy of its director of photography Bruno Tiezzi, a “recuperando,” for “those in recovery,” stands before the entrance to the prison, over which hangs the APAC slogan: “Here enters the person, the crime stays outside.”
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Stephen G. Adubato
Criminals “are not dangerous people. They are only people who are not sufficiently loved.”
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Eduardo Campos Lima
In a region of vast distances, weak infrastructure and a relatively small number of priests, religious and laywomen like Sister Laura are the mainstay of Catholic spirituality.
Brazilian Sisters of Providence celebrate a novice’s final vow ceremony with a ‘selfie’ in September 2020. Photo courtesy of Sisters of Providence
FaithDispatches
Filipe Domingues
Besides taking up the challenge of exploring new frontiers of evangelization in Africa, Asia and Latin America, Brazilian women religious have also become evangelizers of the “old continent,” Europe, where female vocations have radically declined in recent decades.