Mexican Catholic Church: Mexicans can't feel safe anywhere 

Veracruz state police man a standing roadblock on a highway leaving Coatzacoalcos, Mexico, in July. Despite President Enrique Pena Nieto's promises of a safer nation when he came to power five years ago, the violence is outpacing even the darkest days of the drug war launched by his predecessor. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell) Veracruz state police man a standing roadblock on a highway leaving Coatzacoalcos, Mexico, in July. Despite President Enrique Pena Nieto's promises of a safer nation when he came to power five years ago, the violence is outpacing even the darkest days of the drug war launched by his predecessor. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexico's Roman Catholic Church said in an editorial that Mexicans can't feel safe anywhere, as homicides rise throughout the country.

The statement Sunday by the Mexican Council of Bishops came on the same day that the bodies of two men and a woman were left at the entrance to a once-quiet, exclusive beach resort.

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"This is not a single corner of this country where Mexicans can feel safe and live in peace," The bishops' council wrote in an editorial.

Prosecutors in the state of Baja California Sur reported three bodies left in a car in the resort of Cabo San Lucas. All three apparently had bullet wounds.

The twin resorts of Los Cabos have been hit by a wave of grisly slayings in recent months.

Meanwhile, prosecutors in the Gulf coast state of Veracruz said Sunday they had identified the bodies of three women aged 17, 19 and 26, who had been missing since May 1. The bodies were found in a clandestine burial pit in the Veracruz township of Atzacan.

And in the southern state of Guerrero, the state security spokesman said three prison guards faced charges in a prison fight last week between rival gangs in which 28 inmates were killed. Spokesman Roberto Alvarez said the guards were being charged with "direct participation" in the killings.

In May, Mexico recorded its highest monthly murder total in at least 20 years. In 2011, the previous worst year, homicides were concentrated in states like Chihuahua, Sinaloa and Tamaulipas.

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