Synod in San Diego

Bishop Robert McElroy of the Diocese of San Diego has convened a diocesan synod to meet on Oct. 28-29 to reflect on the major themes of the recent apostolic exhortation “The Joy of Love.” The bishop believes the synod will not only help San Diego Catholics grapple with the modern challenges to family life and the church as they are explored in the exhortation; it will also offer the diocese a new model for “being church.” Bishop McElroy proposes turning the diocesan synod into a biannual, theme-driven event, an opportunity for spiritual renewal, reflection and “meaningful lay input into important sets of decisions within the governance of the diocese.” The San Diego synod may be the first such structured diocesan-wide response to “The Joy of Love” worldwide.

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William Rydberg
4 years 2 months ago
One wishes that they could come up with a new Noun to describe what is contemplated. In the Roman Catholic context, the word "synod" is a really loaded word. Check out the Catholic Encyclopedia if not convinced. Picking up and running with the term as though one were Protestant, Presbyterians, Etc.. Seems disingenuous in my opinion, since there is no established Catholic Tradition. One really ought to eliminate any potential of seeming to be portrayed as effete Diocese. Finally, seems like an expensive undertaking for just one Diocese, considering they are planning to invoke on a regular basis, they must have considerable financial and human resources. Just my opinion, in Christ, Blessed be the Holy Trinity...
William Rydberg
4 years 2 months ago
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