Jesus’ journey continues as he rides into Jerusalem and is welcomed like a king. In this episode, we walk alongside Jesus as he rides into the city. Watch as the people greet him by laying down their cloaks and palm branches. Listen as they sing, “Hosanna to the Son of David. Hosanna in the highest.”

“They went out to receive Him, strewing in the way their garments and the branches of the trees, saying: ‘Save us, Son of David, blessed is He that comes in the name of the Lord: Save us in the heights!’” - Spiritual Exercises of Saint Ignatius 287

It can be helpful to review the text of a story before you begin a contemplative exercise. This episode is based on the Scripture accounts of the Entrance of Jesus into Jerusalem, which is found in each of the four Gospel accounts. Feel free to pick one or more accounts to reflect upon:

 

Use the following images if you would like some help guiding your imagination to build this scene, but only insofar as they are helpful. Please don’t feel restricted by these images. Allow your imagination to add or change details as it happens naturally for you. Don’t worry about complete historical accuracy. The point of the exercise is connection with Jesus.

 

Go with the disciples to find a young donkey for Jesus.

Donkey

 

People lay down cloaks and cut palm branches to lay before Jesus.

Palm

 

Jesus enters Jerusalem while people sing, "Hosanna to the son of David. Hosanna in the highest."

Jerusalem

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