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After preaching to a large crowd, Jesus instructs his disciples to give them something to eat. In this episode, we will witness the miracle of the feeding of 5000. Join the disciples as they hand over five loaves of bread and two fish to Jesus. Walk through the crowd and watch as everyone has something to eat.

“Christ our Lord….blessed and broke and gave the bread to his disciples, and the disciples to the multitude..” - Spiritual Exercises of Saint Ignatius 283

It can be helpful to review the text of a story before you begin a contemplative exercise. This episode is based on the Scripture accounts of the Feeding of the 5000, which is found in each of the four Gospel accounts. Feel free to pick one or more accounts to reflect upon:

 

Use the following images if you would like some help guiding your imagination to build this scene, but only insofar as they are helpful. Please don’t feel restricted by these images. Allow your imagination to add or change details as it happens naturally for you. Don’t worry about complete historical accuracy. The point of the exercise is connection with Jesus.

A crowd followed Jesus to a deserted place

Space

 

The disciples gave Jesus five loaves and two fish, which he blessed.

Bread

The crowd of 5000 ate and were satisfied.

Crowd

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