Introducing our new Examen Podcast with Father James Martin

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A resolution may be a way to embrace what Jesus asks us to do in the Gospels, which is to live more loving lives. Actually, the word Jesus used, at least in the Greek New Testament, was metanoia. That means a change of mind or heart. Often in Lent our resolutions end up being giving up chocolate or going on a diet. But the real Lenten project is to enter into a deeper relationship with your fellow human beings, with all of creation, and especially with God.

That’s why this first week of Lent is a good time to start this new podcast on the examen. Because the examen is a powerful way to start to see where God is in your life, and to deepen your relationship with God. And that’s a great way to begin Lent, and to begin your own metanoia.

 

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Mike Theman
1 year 10 months ago

Father Martin, do you remember "Deep Thoughts" from SNL?

Austin Ahlgrim
1 year 9 months ago

Great article with great insights!

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