Miami's archbishop prays for Catholics in Cuba who had to hide their faith

People celebrate a day after the announcement of the death of Cuban revolutionary leader Fidel Castro in the Little Havana district of Miami Nov. 27. Castro, who seized power in a 1959 revolution and governed Cuba until 2006, died Nov. 25 at the age of 90. (CNS photo/Javier Galeano, Reuters)

On the day the news of Fidel Castro's death spread, Archbishop Thomas G. Wenski of Miami was one of the first Catholic Church officials to respond early on Nov. 26.

"Fidel Castro is dead," he wrote in a statement. "The death of this figure should lead us to invoke the patroness of Cuba, the Virgin of Charity, calling for peace for Cuba and its people."


Later that day at Ermita de la Caridad, a Miami shrine that honors Cuba's patron Our Lady of Charity of El Cobre and one built, he said in his homily, "with the sacrifices of the (Cuban) exiles," he focused on the suffering of Catholic Cuba and the news of Castro's death. The 90-year-old former leader of Cuba reportedly died late at night on Nov. 25. 

"The Cuban people are a noble people, but also a people who suffer," Archbishop Wenski said. "And now, on the eve of this first Sunday of Advent, to emphasize the words of Christ 'at the hour you least expect, the Son of Man will come,' we have learned that Fidel Castro has died."

He continued: "Each human being, each of us, will die. We will all be judged one day. Today, it is his (Fidel Castro's) turn. God's judgment is merciful, but it doesn't cease to be just."

Archbishop Wenski asked those gathered to invoke Our Lady of Charity of El Cobre and ask for her intercession.

"She has accompanied the Cuban people for more than 400 years," he said, including during the country's battle for independence and she "suffered with the church when the Marxist obscurantism wounded and decimated (the church)."

She has been there in good times and in times of turmoil, in the Cuban prisons and in the agricultural "forced labor camps" the Cuban government operated, he said.

Referencing recent moments in the history of the island when Catholics hid their faith fearing persecution by a government and a society that looked down on religion, he said the Virgin was present in the prayer cards people hid in their dressers, as church members were "forced to survive by publicly denying their devotion."

And Mary is there with those who, despite all the challenges they have faced, continue to pass on the gift of faith to their children and grandchildren on the island.

She remains on the island today, he said, and continues to lavish her motherly love "in prisons that still are not empty and in the midst of women who walk demanding freedom."

Our Lady of Charity of El Cobre is present, Archbishop Wenski said, with those inside and outside Cuba, who "fight for respect for human dignity and to establish a future of freedom, justice and peace."

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
Tom Fields
1 year 3 months ago

More: US Church

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

The Vatican has released the complete letter by Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI about Pope Francis after facing criticism for manipulating a photograph of it.
Gerard O’ConnellMarch 17, 2018
This week’s top U.S.-Latino Catholic news
J.D. Long-GarcíaMarch 16, 2018
U.S. President Barack Obama presents the Medal of Freedom to Stephen Hawking during a ceremony at the White House in Washington Aug. 12, 2009 (CNS photo/Paul Haring).
There have been great physicists and mathematicians who were also great philosophers. Hawking, unfortunately, was not one of them.
Stephen M. BarrMarch 16, 2018
Pope Francis enters the main gate of the Auschwitz Nazi death camp in Oswiecim, Poland, July 29, 2016 (CNS photo/Alessia Giuliani, pool).
Poland’s Catholic primate called anti-Semitism “a moral evil and a sin.”
Catholic News ServiceMarch 16, 2018