St. Alberto Hurtado, SJ: patron saint of multitaskers

Today is the Feast of a Jesuit about whom perhaps you know little: Alberto Hurtado, S.J.  Here's a brief reflection:

Alberto Hurtado was born in 1901 in Viña del Mar in Chile. Father Hurtado, canonized in 2005 by Pope Benedict XVI, was a man that many of my Jesuit friends actually knew. Today in Chile today he is a national hero. 

Alberto was born into a once-aristocratic family. When he was four, Alberto's father died, and the family, now impoverished, was forced to live with a succession of relatives. A scholarship enabled him to attend St. Ignatius Academy, a Jesuit school in Santiago. As a teenager, he spent time with the poor in the city's slums on Sunday afternoons. After graduation Alberto considered becoming a Jesuit but his spiritual directed suggested waiting until his family was "better situated," as Joseph Tylenda, SJ, writes in his book Jesuit Saints and Martyrs. 

In March 1918, he began studying law at the Catholic University of Chile, and continued to visit the poor every Sunday. "He was incapable of seeing pain, nor indeed any need," recalled his spiritual director from the time, "without seeking a way to solve it." Though marriage held great appeal he decided to enter the Jesuit novitiate, which he did in 1923, at age 22. His discernment found confirmation almost immediately. "Here you have me, finally a Jesuit," he wrote to a close friend, "as happy and content as one can be on this earth!" 

Alberto completed the standard formation of the Jesuit—novitiate, philosophy studies, full-time work and then theology—before being ordained in 1933. Along the way he won the admiration of his peers for his charity, kindness and prayerfulness. His vibrant personality gives lie to the stereotype of the saints as dour, gloomy types. "Being with him was so enjoyable because he made you feel so comfortable," said one friend. After his ordination Alberto returned to teach religion to children at St. Ignatius, and to adults at the Catholic University, and also gave the Spiritual Exercises. 

Hurtado's commitment to the poor endured. In addition to his teaching, he worked with the Chilean poor, especially the disadvantaged youth and young adults. In 1940, he was appointed director of "Catholic Action," a national youth movement. Questioning the country's commitment to the poor and taking aim at declining vocations to the priesthood, he wrote a provocative book entitled Is Chile a Catholic Country? 

In 1944, Hurtado had an epiphany: a homeless man approached him on the street on a cold night. "A poor man, in shirtsleeves, suffering from tonsillitis, and shivering with cold, approached me saying he had nowhere to find shelter." 

A few days later, while directing a women's retreat he recounted this experience to his audience, and asked them to turn their thoughts to the poor. "Christ is without a home!" he said.  He continued:

Christ roams through our streets in the person of so many of the suffering poor, sick and dispossessed, and people thrown out of their miserable slums; Christ huddled under bridges, in the person of so many children who lack someone to call father, who have been deprived for many years without a mother's kiss on their foreheads…Christ is without a home! Shouldn't we want to give him one, those of us who have the joy of a comfortable home, plenty of good food, the means to educate and assure the future of our children? "What you do to the least of me, you do to me," Jesus said. 

His impassioned remarks inspired the gathered women to pool their resources, which marked the beginning of the work that Alberto Hurtado is best known for: Hogar de Christo. (As one Jesuit said, this means that the women founded the Hogar!) Hogar means "hearth" or "home." Hurtado wanted to welcome the poor into "Christ's home." 

In 1945 the first Hogar opened and quickly attracted volunteers; within a few years similar hospices spread across Chile. Hospices not only offered their guests shelter, they also taught them technical skills and Christian values. At the same time, Hurtado continued his retreat work, his speaking and his work with youth. (At one point Hurtado came to the United States to visit Father Flanagan's famous Boys' Town, to study their operation and management techniques.) Between 1945 and 1951 some 850,000 children received help from Hogar de Cristo. 

From all accounts Hurtado was an intensely busy man. In 1946, he bought a green pickup truck to better bring at-risk children living on the street back to the shelters. He called them his patroncitos, his "little bosses." In addition to his work with Hogar, his retreats and outreach to youth, he wrote several books and found the journal Mensaje, a Catholic magazine designed to highlight the social teachings of the church, and which is still proudly published by the Chilean Jesuits. 

Despite his hectic schedule, Alberto understood the need for the balance between prayer and work, striving to be a "contemplative in action." On the one hand, the activist is the one who at every moment recognizes "the divine impulse." On the other, prayer should not encourage a "sleepy sort of laziness under the pretext of keeping ourselves united with God."  I like to think of him as the patron saint of multitaskers. 

By the age of 50, though, Alberto seemed to his friends worn out. After a physician-ordered vacation, he returned to discover that he had pancreatic cancer. The end would come quickly and painfully. Yet during his suffering he was often heard to say, "I am content, O Lord, I am content." He died at age 51.

His funeral, in the Church of St. Ignatius in Santiago, was filled with so many of the poor who venerated Padre Hurtado that many of his close friends had to remain outside. Alberto Hurtado was canonized by Pope Benedict XVI in 2005. All of Chile celebrated the man who the country's president called one of Chile's "founding fathers." 

One of my Jesuit friends, Tom, who recently worked in Chile, told me that he once met a man named Juanito, one of the original children rescued from the poverty by Padre Hurtado. Tom visited Juanito's house when sick, and the old man started passionately to pound the table saying, "This man was a saint! What a good man who gave of himself...and his selflessness!"

Tom said, "For me it seems that saints are from another time. But holy cow! Here was someone who knew him!" Juanito died four days later. 

In Santiago, near the original Hogar, is a shrine to Alberto, where many come to pray. Inside is his beat-up green pickup. 

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Joe Garcia
7 years 1 month ago
Thanks, Father! A lovely synopsis of this great, great man.

AMDG!
7 years 1 month ago
A great story and another person to add to the list of those that make us so proud to be Catholics.


Relevant to Hurtado's comment ''Christ is without a home!'' ,there is a famous painting from a pre Raphaelites artist named Holman Hunt.  In the painting, Christ is knocking at the door but no one answers.  Here is a link to the painting


http://www.artistsforchrist.net/2008/11/the-light-of-the-world-holman-hunt/ 
Thomas Piatak
7 years 1 month ago
An excellent piece.
7 years 1 month ago

It is good to be reminded that there have always been, and always will be, Jesuits of such holy worth. I am reminded of Father McKenna SJ. I work with the dispossesed on a psychiatric unit in DC and have therefore become personally aware of Horace McKenna's work. The best run social service agency in DC in the legacy Fr.McKenna left: So Others Might Eat (SOME).

My father knew Fr. McKenna. How he loved the poor. My father told me that Fr. McKenna, for a period of time, used to sleep on a door mat guarding a woman who was being continually beaten. I keep these words of Fr. McKenns SJ at my deskl

When God let’s me into heaven, I think I’ll
ask to go off in a corner somewhere for a half
an hour and sit down and cry because the
strain is off, the work is done, and I haven’t
been unfaithful or disloyal. All these needs
that I have known are in the hands of Providence
and I won’t have to worry any longer
who’s at the door, whose breadbox is empty,
whose baby is sick, whose house is shaken and
discouraged, and whose children can’t read.”

Horace McKenna, S.J.
7 years 1 month ago
It is good to be reminded that there have always been, and always will be, Jesuits of such holy worth. I am reminded of Father McKenna SJ. I work with the dispossessed on a psychiatric unit in DC and have therefore become personally aware of Horace McKenna's work. The best run social service agency in DC in the legacy Fr.McKenna left: So Others Might Eat (SOME).

My father knew Fr. McKenna. How he loved the poor. My father told me that Fr. McKenna, for a period of time, used to sleep on a door mat guarding a woman who was being continually beaten. I keep these words of Fr. McKenna SJ at my desk

When God let’s me into heaven, I think I’ll
ask to go off in a corner somewhere for a half
an hour and sit down and cry because the
strain is off, the work is done, and I haven’t
been unfaithful or disloyal. All these needs
that I have known are in the hands of Providence
and I won’t have to worry any longer
who’s at the door, whose breadbox is empty,
whose baby is sick, whose house is shaken and
discouraged, and whose children can’t read.”

Horace McKenna, S.J.
Molly Roach
7 years 1 month ago
A completely beautiful and inspiring account of the life of a very good man.   It is
always a privilege to encounter such stories-there is such good nourishment in them. 
Julio Vidaurrazaga
7 years 1 month ago
Thank you Fr Martin! As a Chilean Catholic I appreciate your article.
I did not meet  St. Alberto(I remember, as a child, the comments at home about his  funeral) but I met many of his disciples in the Society , I know-  as all Chilean people   about him , I have prayed several times at his tomb  and I am very glad that you remembered him. An extraordinary man and a MODEL for Christians,

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