The National Catholic Review

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  • December 5-12, 2016

    Was a report that Pope Francis had endorsed the Republican nominee, Donald J. Trump, enough to lock down your vote on Election Day? Maybe you changed your mind after hearing that the pope had endorsed the Democratic nominee, Hillary Clinton? Were you startled to learn that Wikileaks “confirmed” that Secretary of State Clinton put U.S. weapons into the hands of Islamic State terrorists? If so, well, you have been had by fake news, and you were likely not alone this past November.

    Pew...

  • November 28, 2016

    This was an election about class. This was an election about trade, globalization and fears about immigration. This was an election about upheaval and rejection of a distant elite. This was an election about race and gender. All of these statements are true.

    Above all, however, this was an election about division. While president-elect Donald J. Trump won convincingly in the Electoral College, and thus requires both our support and our prayers, the harder task still lies ahead. No...

  • November 21, 2016

    By late November, a sense of closure sets in. Thanksgiving Day is a time to look back: What good things have I experienced since a year ago? Whom have I met? Where have I gone? How am I a better person? In the Catholic calendar, the Solemnity of Christ the King ends the liturgical cycle before we begin again with the First Sunday of Advent, a chance to start over a month before our civil calendar runs out.

    This year, Christ the King, on Nov. 20, wrapped up the Jubilee Year of Mercy...

  • Durante su última visita a los Estados Unidos, el papa Francisco le recordó a los estadounidenses que es un deber cristiano darle la bienvenida a los inmigrantes y “ofrecerles el calor del amor de Cristo”. Más de un año después, muchos católicos, como el arzobispo José Gómez de Los Angeles, conservan las palabras del papa en sus corazones. Según el arzobispo Gómez, se está dando un “momento latino” en los Estados...

  • November 14, 2016

    What can a nation or church do when its leaders mislead? Some political leaders take the “strong man” approach, using violence to win popular support and to distract from domestic problems. Can their strategy be morally justified if they bring about peace, or at least the semblance of peace? Not if they defy civil, international or the moral law. Not if they sacrifice innocent life.

    President Vladimir Putin, to re-establish Russia as a global superpower and solidify his own...

  • En mayo de 2015, un mes antes de que la Corte Suprema de los Estados Unidos fallara a favor del matrimonio civil entre parejas del mismo sexo, una serie de eventos inesperados se desencadenaron en Alemania. Con una mayoría de dos tercios, la conferencia de obispos de la Iglesia católica alemana votó para cambiar las leyes laborales de la Iglesia. De esta manera, los empleados de instituciones católicas que se hayan divorciado, vuelto a casar o que estén en una unión con alguien del...

  • November 7, 2016

    In May 2015, one month before the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of civil marriage for same-sex couples, a series of unexpected events unfolded in Germany. By a two-thirds vote, the German Catholic bishops’ conference voted to change church labor law so that employees of Catholic institutions who divorce and remarry or who enter same-sex unions will not be subject to dismissal.

    Civil unions for same-sex couples have been legal in Germany since 2001. What sparked last year's policy...

  • October 31, 2016

    Police in East Liverpool, Ohio, recently shared on social media a photo of two adults slumped over in the front seats of a car, while a 4-year-old boy sat in the back seat. The adults had overdosed on heroin, almost leading to their deaths, and the police hoped the image might shock people into recognizing the damage that opioid abuse can cause. To some degree, it worked. The photo, which received national attention, prompted local government action.

    Unfortunately, stories like this...

  • October 24, 2016

    Pope Francis recently voiced concern about countries that “are too politicized” but “do not have a political culture.” That is a good description of where the United States is heading: deeply split by political differences but losing the ability to discuss such differences civilly, much less settle them. Candidates for public office often promise to end “politics as usual...

  • October 17, 2016

    During his visit to the United States last year, Pope Francis reminded Americans that it is a Christian duty to welcome immigrants and “offer them the warmth of the love of Christ.” Over a year later, many Catholics, like Archbishop José Gómez of Los Angeles, have taken the pope’s call to heart. According to Archbishop Gómez, there is a “Latino moment” underway in the United States. “I think it’s even more clear to me, with the election, how important it is to help...the Latino culture to...