Worlds Migrants Call U.S. and Europe Home

Recent statistics show an increase in the number of international migrants over the past 10 years, with Europe having the most international migrants. The International Organization for Migration estimates that the number of global migrants increased from 150 million people in 2000 to 214 million in 2010. The organization also reported that the number of refugees worldwide was 15.4 million in 2010, while the number of internally displaced persons increased to 27.5 million in 2010 from 21 million in 2000. Of the total migrant population, about 49 percent were women. About 72.1 million international migrants resided in Europe, while 19.3 million migrants were recorded in Africa. The figures reflect the trend of migrants moving from less developed regions to more developed regions that provide more economic opportunities. According to the Pew Hispanic Center, the nation with the most immigrants was the United States, with 38.5 million people born in a foreign country.

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Edward Lally (center) is joined by his schola, Sarah Coffman, Katherine Keberlein, Ngaire Bull and Sarah Beatty, at St. Edward's Catholic Church in Chicago on April 8, 2017. Photo courtesy of Sarah Beatty.
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Judith ValenteApril 25, 2017
Vivian Tuttle holds a photo of her daughter Yvonne, who was murdered during a 2002 bank robbery in Norfolk, Neb., as she testifies in favor of the death penalty at a public hearing in Omaha, Neb. in October 2016 (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, file).
The fight against the death penalty lays bare the strengths and weaknesses of the Catholic approach to pro-life issues.
Joseph P. HooverApril 25, 2017
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Eric Sundrup, S.J.April 25, 2017
A rally hosted by Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont for a Nebraska Democrat prompted a flurry of questions about the party's pro-choice orthodoxy.
Michael O'LoughlinApril 24, 2017