A Polarized Church?

In discussing important issues of the times, Catholics should not adopt the “vicious” rhetoric of partisan politics, a panelist told the National Council of Catholic Women on Nov. 12. “We need to be utterly intolerant of trashing other people in the church,” said Carol Keehan, D.C., president and chief executive officer of the Catholic Health Association. “It undermines the charity that is at the heart of the church.” Keehan, of the Daughters of Charity, was among five Catholic leaders who participated in a panel discussion opening the N.C.C.W.’s 90th anniversary convention in Washing-ton. Another panel member, John Carr, executive director of the U.S. bishops’ Department of Justice, Peace and Human Development, urged that Catholic teaching not be seen as an “either/or” proposition. “It’s about human life and dignity, human rights and responsibility. It begins with life, but it doesn’t end there.” Carr also criticized the “intense polarization, partisanship and politicization” that has seeped into the church from U.S. culture. “We can divide up the work, but we can’t divide up the church,” he said.

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

At Rome's Basilica of St. Bartholomew, a shrine to modern martyrs, Pope Francis presided over an evening prayer service April 22, honoring Christians killed under Nazism, communism, dictatorships and terrorism.
The conference brought together six lay people from different countries “to reflect on the post-synod apostolic exhortation that has aroused grave perplexities and widespread unease in numerous components of the Catholic world.”
Gerard O'ConnellApril 22, 2017
These photos, patches of uniforms and drawings create a piecemeal account of life at Dachau during and after the war.
Teresa DonnellanApril 21, 2017
Demonstrators march during a Feb. 25 rally organized by Catholics Against the Death Penalty in Southern California (CNS photo/Andrew Cullen, Reuters).
Christianity is not a relic laid in a museum; it is not a book entombed in an archive. It lives in the living people of God.
John T. Noonan, Jr.April 21, 2017