Capital Crimes

Michael Moore’s repeated drumbeats defending the “little guy” against threatening social forces may not be as satisfying a remedy as Catholic social teaching’s call to make an “option for the poor.” But Moore’s approach makes for lively, feature-length documentaries, like his new release, Capitalism: A Love Story.

For 20 years, Moore has been exposing the harm inflicted upon average Americans by heartless corporations, including those that peddle guns, pollute the environment, downsize workers and deny reliable health care coverage to millions. His new offering targets not just one industry or policy but the entire market system. The financial crisis provides stark new material for anyone intent on lambasting our misplaced trust in self-serving chief executive officers, corrupt government officials, greedy lobbyists and a host of other villains.

But Moore is not a humorless ideologue caviling from the left. While a verb like denounce applies to his work, expose and lampoon are even more descriptive. Michael Moore is one part class clown and one part prophet of doom. Sometimes he makes his points seriously, as with his footage of crumbling rustbelt devastation or chilling homemade videos of frightened families being evicted from their freshly foreclosed homes. Just as often, he stages zany publicity stunts to embarrass greedy parties caught with their hand in the cookie jar. Recent taxpayer bailouts of banks and other firms deemed “too big to fail” also provide him with rich fodder.

Each of his films includes one indisputable accomplishment: the use of lively video montage that keeps viewers off balance. We never know where we will be taken next, whom we will encounter or what emotions will be evoked. Detractors accuse Moore of manipulating facts, indulging in inexcusable simplification and engaging in lazy thinking. On this last count, they have a point. Nowhere does the film seriously address the key distinction between the basic principles of capitalism and real-world abuses. Does social betterment require scrapping the entire market system or merely reforming a few practices and replacing the worst culprits?

If we want a serious ethical analysis of economic systems and their shortcomings, we will be better off reading the latest papal social encyclical. But anyone wanting a vivid illustration of the principles found in such documents would do well to see Michael Moore’s exposé of the ways of greed and his defense of the little guy in our contemporary economy.

 

7 years 7 months ago

I do not know the commentator's life experience but I do  know many members of Moore's disfranchized societies would have no  idea what to make of  a "serious ethical analysis." Most of their tormentors  would have  similar and other problems with Rome.s  theology . Moore uses a two by four to focus attention. Unfortunatly , unlike "us" the "little guy"  never had the luxury of a Jesuit  education. .

7 years 7 months ago

Dear Father Massaro:  We must have seen different versions of a film about capitalism by Michael Moore.  I take Mr. Moore's films for what they are: a humerous well reseached statement about abberations in the allocations of power and money in a capitalist, democratic society.  I have read the applicable encyclicals and I think Mr. Moore captures the spirit of every one germane to his theme. God Bless.  Bill Hahn U. Detroit, 1951 Graduate studies in economics at Claremont University, Claremont, CA.  AMDG

7 years 7 months ago

  Who else out there is articulating Catholic social issues like this man does? Who would Dorothy Day support today who is communicating her values?  Maybe the writer and Jesuit from St. Peter's College in Jersey City could develop a course outline of movies highlighting Catholic social issues to get the young people fired up. The suggestion by the Jesuit from Boston College  that we read the latest papal encyclical doesn't do a thing for me. Michael Moore is today's Dorothy Day.

Mary Custer
7 years 7 months ago

Say anything you want about Michael Moore's movies and the way he gets his point across to the people.  I believe he is a great role model for Catholic education. If everyone who had the benefit of a Catholic education was as vocal about Social Justice as M. Moore we would have a very different country and world. 

Mary Custer
7 years 7 months ago

Say anything you want about Michael Moore's movies and the way he gets his point across to the people.  I believe he is a great role model for Catholic education. If everyone who had the benefit of a Catholic education was as vocal about Social Justice as M. Moore we would have a very different country and world. 

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