Nuns and 'Zombieland'

Just in time for Halloween, I saw the comedy-horror movie Zombieland this week, a film about a post-apocalyptic world in which nearly every human being has been infected with a condition that turns them into cannibalistic zombies. (I’m told this is different from the type of zombies that are dead and come back to life. I am no expert in zombie taxonomy, so any corrections will be appreciated).

But what could possibly be in "Zombieland" that would interest the readers of In All Things? Well, they do give viewers the 32 rules to surviving a zombie world (Rule #1: Cardio; zombies can’t run very fast), which could prove useful if H1N1 evolves into something far more insidious this winter. Yet aside from that, a small detail I found interesting was the portrayal of a Catholic nun in the movie. The nun was credited with the Zombie kill of the week, and leaving aside the ethics of a nun killing a zombie (self defense?), I found it interesting that the nun was presented in plain clothes, and not a religious habit. Only because the narrator identified the character with the title “sister” did we know she was a nun. So years after Vatican II, when many women religious now dress is plain clothes, Hollywood has picked up on the phenomenon as well. A small, though perhaps telling, change in popular culture’s understanding of religious life?

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

“Amoris Laetitia” addresses the reality of Catholics in “non-legitimate unions” and opens the possibility for them to receive the Eucharist under certain conditions.
Gerard O'ConnellFebruary 22, 2017
Immigration officials “no longer will exempt classes or categories of removable aliens from potential enforcement” and “have full authority to arrest or apprehend an alien whom an immigration officer has probable cause to believe is in violation of the immigration laws.”
Michael O'LoughlinFebruary 21, 2017
El sistema de libre empresa es compatible con nuestra preocupación por los desfavorecidos, escribe un economista y católico converso.
Arthur C. BrooksFebruary 21, 2017
The pope's emphasis on protecting undocumented workers is particularly significant for Europe and the United States, where the treatment of refugees and migrants has been a consistent challenge.
Gerard O'ConnellFebruary 21, 2017