Fr. Jim Martin on NPR

Culture editor James Martin, S.J., visited Milwaukee recently for the Archdiocese's annual "Pallium Lecture," sponsored by Archbishop Jerome Listecki. While there, he spoke with the NPR show "Lake Effect" on Ignatian spirituality, Jesuit life and the role of humor in the church. Listen here.  (Scroll down to "Living the Jesuit Life.")

Tim Reidy

 

JAMES BARRY
6 years 7 months ago
Fr. Martin's comments begin at about 25:30 on this stream.
6 years 7 months ago
This is a wonderful interview.
I wish Fr. Martin though, in speaking of evangelization, would emphasize witness more than explanation, for in our divided society and Church, folks (especially on line) see more angry division and less of the love that Christ wants shown.I think Fr. Kavanaugh, in America, elsewhere has written well on this.
Fr. Martin by example is neither slavish or hypercritical as many are today and his humor is sorely lacking in some comments at this blog and replaced by self righteous stuffiness by posters.
Elsewhere, Fr. Martin justly critizcizes Minnesota Dems for their ugly criticiams reacting to the Bishop there.Unfortunately, appreciation of many good things done for the poor by clergy and laity are overlooked because of leaderships politics and policies.
So deep down, religion is suffering at the hands of spirituality because, unlike the early Church: ''see how these Christians love one another. they  need to hear more messages like this and less divisive pieces from both sides and above!

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